Minority Health Archive

The Tuskegee Timeline

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2008) The Tuskegee Timeline. UNSPECIFIED.

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Abstract

In 1932, the Public Health Service, working with the Tuskegee Institute, began a study to record the natural history of syphilis in hopes of justifying treatment programs for blacks. It was called the "Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male." The study initially involved 600 black men – 399 with syphilis, 201 who did not have the disease. The study was conducted without the benefit of patients' informed consent. Researchers told the men they were being treated for "bad blood," a local term used to describe several ailments, including syphilis, anemia, and fatigue. In truth, they did not receive the proper treatment needed to cure their illness. In exchange for taking part in the study, the men received free medical exams, free meals, and burial insurance. Although originally projected to last 6 months, the study actually went on for 40 years.


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Item Type: Other
Additional Information: Access to full text is subject to the publisher's access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Public Health Service; Tuskegee Institute; Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male; Timeline, Tuskegee Study, Syphilis, Tuskegee
Subjects: Government Publications
Health > Health Equity > Bioethics
Health
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    Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
    Date Deposited: 08 Oct 2008
    Last Modified: 21 Mar 2012 22:05
    Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.pitt.edu/id/eprint/1085

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