Minority Health Archive

AN EVALUATION OF THE KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND BELIEFS OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN MEN AND THEIR FEMALE SIGNIFICANT OTHERS REGARDING PROSTATE CANCER SCREENING

Webb, Chanty R. and Kronheim, Linda and Williams, James E., Jr. and Hartman, Terryl J. (2006) AN EVALUATION OF THE KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND BELIEFS OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN MEN AND THEIR FEMALE SIGNIFICANT OTHERS REGARDING PROSTATE CANCER SCREENING. Ethnicity & Disease, 16 (1). pp. 234-238.

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Abstract

This study examines the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of African-American men and their female significant others regarding prostate cancer screening. Study flyers and a television interview were used to recruit participants into the study that took place in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Six focus groups were conducted: four with African-American men and two with female significant others. A total of 32 people participated in the study. The groups expressed multiple apprehensions toward prostate cancer screening, including feelings of vulnerability, compromised manhood, and discomfort. They also shared motivators for screening, including female significant others, physician recommendation, early education, and church influence.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: After clicking on link, scroll down the page to find article.
Uncontrolled Keywords: African-American Men; Digital Rectal Exam; Focus Groups; Health Beliefs; Prostate Cancer Screening; PSA
Subjects: Health > Public Health
Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases > Cancer
Research > studies
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Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 22 Dec 2008
Last Modified: 02 Jun 2011 10:36
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.pitt.edu/id/eprint/1262

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