Minority Health Archive

African-American and White Head and Neck Carcinoma Patients in a University Medical Center Setting: Are Treatments Provided and Are Outcomes Similar or Disparate?

Murdock, Joan M and Gluckman, Jack L (2001) African-American and White Head and Neck Carcinoma Patients in a University Medical Center Setting: Are Treatments Provided and Are Outcomes Similar or Disparate? Cancer, 91 (1 Supp). pp. 279-283.

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Abstract

Racial and ethnic disparities occur in many areas of the health care management system in the United States. These disparities include disease incidence, access to health and medical services, treatments provided, and disease outcomes. Health care delivery organizations have limited resources. Encounters between patients and providers in health care delivery organizations typically are cross-cultural. Access to care, quality of care, and equity may be affected by limited resources and cross-cultural encounters. This impacts the diagnosis, treatments provided, and outcomes, with African-American patients faring poorly compared with white patients. African Americans are 15% more likely to develop cancer than whites and are about 34% more likely to die of cancer than whites in the United States. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the characteristics of African-American patients and white patients with carcinoma of the head and neck at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, an equal-access facility, reporting similarities and disparities in disease stage at the time of diagnosis, treatment received, and patient outcomes.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available at the publisher’s Web site. Access to the full text is subject to the publisher’s access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: head and neck carcinoma, racial differences, equal-access facility, mortality by race, sociologic factors affecting outcomes, cancer demographics.
Subjects: Health > Health Equity > Access To Healthcare
Health > Disparities
Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases > Cancer
Practice > service
Research
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Kismet Loftin-Bell
Date Deposited: 17 Aug 2005
Last Modified: 13 Jul 2011 21:42
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.pitt.edu/id/eprint/169

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