Minority Health Archive

Barriers to service use for postpartum depression symptoms among low-income ethnic minority mothers in the United States.

Abrams, Laura S and Dornig, Katrina and Curran, Laura (2009) Barriers to service use for postpartum depression symptoms among low-income ethnic minority mothers in the United States. Qualitative health research, 19 (4). pp. 535-51. ISSN 1049-7323

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Abstract

The risks of untreated postpartum depression (PPD) in the United States are higher among low-income ethnic minority mothers. However, research has not adequately investigated barriers to formal help seeking for PPD symptoms among this vulnerable population. We used convenience and purposive sampling strategies to recruit mothers experiencing past-year (the year prior to interview) PPD symptoms (n=14), community key informants (n=11), and service providers (n=12) to participate in focus groups and individual interviews. A grounded theory analysis of these nested perspectives revealed individual, community, and provider-level barriers operating at various stages of the help-seeking process: thinking about symptoms, seeking advice, and rejecting formal care. Although mothers overwhelmingly recommended "talking it out" for other mothers with PPD, an array of attitudinal and instrumental barriers led mothers to choose self-help practices in lieu of formal mental health care.


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Item Type: Article
Subjects: Health > Disparities
Health > Prenatal & Pediatric Health
Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases > Mental Health
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Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 19 May 2011 16:21
Last Modified: 19 May 2011 16:21
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.pitt.edu/id/eprint/2479

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