Minority Health Archive

Prevalence of overweight and obesity among Seventh-day Adventist African American and Caucasian college students.

Pawlak, Roman and Sovyanhadi, Marta (2009) Prevalence of overweight and obesity among Seventh-day Adventist African American and Caucasian college students. Ethnicity & disease, 19 (2). pp. 111-114. ISSN 1049-510X

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Abstract

All age, sex, and racial groups are affected by the obesity epidemic in the United States, although disparities exist among these groups. The Seventh-day Adventists are a religious group of people who are believed to live longer and healthier lives than do their non-Adventist counterparts because they do not smoke or drink alcohol and they eat a healthier diet. This study assessed the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Seventh-day Adventist college students attending 2 private universities in the southern United States. Most students' body mass index (65.8%) was within the normal weight category, 3.7% were underweight, 20.6% were overweight, and 9.9% were obese. Body mass index > or = 25 kg/m2 was more prevalent among men and African Americans. In all ethnic subgroups, the prevalence of overweight and obesity was lower than that among non-Adventist students reported in other studies.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: After clicking link, scroll down the page to find the article.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Obesity, Overweight, Adventists, College Students
Subjects: Health > Disparities
Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases > Obesity
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Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 31 May 2011 11:43
Last Modified: 31 May 2011 11:43
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.pitt.edu/id/eprint/2543

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