Minority Health Archive

The Origins of Informed Consent: The International Scientific Commission on Medical War Crimes, and the Nuremburg Code

Weindling, Paul (2001) The Origins of Informed Consent: The International Scientific Commission on Medical War Crimes, and the Nuremburg Code. Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 75 (1). pp. 37-71. ISSN 1086-3176

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Abstract

The Nuremberg Code has generally been seen as arising from the Nuremberg Medical Trial. This paper examines developments prior to the Trial, involving the physiologist Andrew Conway Ivy and an inter-Allied Scientific Commission on Medical War Crimes. The paper traces the formulation of the concept of a medical war crime by the physiologist John West Thompson, as part of the background to Ivy's code on human experiments of 1 August 1946. It evaluates subsequent responses by the American Medical Association, and by other war crimes experts, notably Leo Alexander, who developed Ivy's conceptual framework. Ivy's interaction with the judges at Nuremberg alerted them to the importance of formulating ethical guidelines for clinical research.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available at the publisher’s Web site. Access to the full text is subject to the publisher’s access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Nuremberg Code, inter-Allied Scientific Commission on Medical War Crimes, human experiments, ethical guidelines, clinical research
Subjects: Health > Health Equity > Bioethics
Health > Policy
Research
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    Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
    Date Deposited: 20 Jul 2011 22:23
    Last Modified: 20 Jul 2011 22:23
    Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.pitt.edu/id/eprint/2792

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