Minority Health Archive

Communication inequalities, social determinants, and intermittent smoking in the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey.

Ackerson, Leland K and Viswanath, Kasisomayajula (2009) Communication inequalities, social determinants, and intermittent smoking in the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey. Preventing chronic disease, 6 (2). A40. ISSN 1545-1151

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Intermittent smokers account for a large proportion of all smokers, and this trend is increasing. Social and communication inequalities may account for disparities in intermittent smoking status. METHODS: Data for this study came from 2,641 ever-smokers from a 2003 nationally representative cross-sectional survey. Independent variables of interest included race/ethnicity, sex, household income, education, health media attention, and cancer-related beliefs. The outcome of interest was smoking status categorized as daily smoker, intermittent smoker, or former smoker. Analyses used 2 sets of multivariable logistic regressions to investigate the associations of covariates with intermittent smokers compared with former smokers and with daily smokers. RESULTS: People with high education and high income, Spanish-speaking Hispanics, and women were the most likely to be intermittent rather than daily smokers. Women and Spanish-speaking Hispanics were the most likely to be intermittent rather than former smokers. Attention to health media sources increased the likelihood that a person would be an intermittent smoker instead of a former or daily smoker. Believing that damage from smoking is avoidable and irreversible was associated with lower odds of being an intermittent smoker rather than a former smoker but did not differentiate intermittent smoking from daily smoking. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that tailoring smoking-cessation campaigns toward intermittent smokers from specific demographic groups by using health media may improve the effect of these campaigns and reduce social health disparities.


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Item Type: Article
Subjects: Health > Health Equity
Health > Disparities
Health > Public Health > Health Risk Factors > Smoking & Tobacco Use
Research
Government Publications > US Department of Health and Human Services > Centers for Disease Control
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Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 24 Jul 2011 21:58
Last Modified: 24 Jul 2011 22:04
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.pitt.edu/id/eprint/2838

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