Minority Health Archive

Development, Implementation, and Effects of Community-Based Diabetes Prevention Program for Obese Latino Youth.

Shaibi, Gabriel Q and Greenwood-Ericksen, Margaret B and Chapman, Cecilia R and Konopken, Yolanda and Ertl, Janice (2010) Development, Implementation, and Effects of Community-Based Diabetes Prevention Program for Obese Latino Youth. Journal of primary care & community health, 1 (3). pp. 206-212. ISSN 2150-1327

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Obesity and type 2 diabetes have emerged as critical health issues among Latino youth. Although both conditions manifest early in life, very few diabetes prevention programs have been developed to specifically meet the needs of this population. The authors describe the development, implementation, and metabolic impact of a culturally informed, community-based diabetes prevention program for obese Latino youth. METHODS: A lifestyle education program was developed to address the health needs of Latino youth served by a community-based medical clinic. The program consisted of group education sessions delivered to children and their families to address nutrition, physical activity, family roles and responsibilities, and self-esteem. The metabolic impact of the program was evaluated by assessing body mass index (BMI), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin. RESULTS: On entry, the prevalence of risk factors among the 102 youth (mean BMI, 30.4 ± 4.9 kg/m(2)) was substantial (68.6% with low HDL cholesterol, 32.1% with elevated triglycerides, 9.4% with impaired fasting glucose, 39.4% with elevated total cholesterol, 43.0% with elevated LDL cholesterol, and 60.6% with hyperinsulinemia). The 50 youth who returned after the program for follow-up measurements exhibited significant health improvements, including a 3.8% reduction in BMI; 5.4% and 8.6% decreases in total and LDL cholesterol, respectively; a 9.3% increase in HDL cholesterol; and a 24.0% decrease in fasting insulin (all P values < .05). CONCLUSIONS: These promising findings suggest that a community-based diabetes prevention program for obese Latino youth is a feasible strategy for improving health in this high-risk population. Further studies are warranted to examine whether similar programs can be implemented in diverse communities and settings.


Export/Citation:EndNote | BibTeX | Dublin Core | ASCII (Chicago style) | HTML Citation | OpenURL | Reference Manager
Social Networking:

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available at the publisher’s Web site. Access to the full text is subject to the publisher’s access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: health disparities, community health, obesity, diabetes, Latino
Subjects: Health > Prenatal & Pediatric Health
Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases > Diabetes
Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases > Obesity
Practice > interventions
Research
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 28 Jul 2011 14:44
Last Modified: 28 Jul 2011 14:50
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.pitt.edu/id/eprint/2907

Actions (login required)

View Item