Minority Health Archive

A Comparison of Self-Reported Energy Intake With Total Energy Expenditure Estimated by Accelerometer and Basal Metabolic Rate in African-American Women With Type 2 Diabetes

Samuel-Hodge, C. D. and Fernandez, L. M. and Henriquez-Roldan, C. F. and Johnston, L. F. and Keyserling, T. C. (2004) A Comparison of Self-Reported Energy Intake With Total Energy Expenditure Estimated by Accelerometer and Basal Metabolic Rate in African-American Women With Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care, 27 (3). pp. 663-669. ISSN 0149-5992

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE—This study assesses the validity of dietary data from African-American women with type 2 diabetes by comparing reported energy intake (EI) with total energy expenditure (TEE) estimated by an accelerometer and basal metabolic rate (BMR). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—EI of 200 African-American women was assessed by three telephone-administered 24-h diet recalls using a multiple-pass approach. Physical activity was measured over a 7-day period by accelerometer, which also provided an estimate of TEE. Underreporting of EI was determined by using cutoffs for EI-to-TEE and EI-to-BMR ratios. RESULTS—Participants, on average, were 59 years of age, with a BMI of 35.7, 10.5 years of diagnosed diabetes, and 10.7 years of education. Mean EI was 1,299 kcal/day; mean EI-to-TEE and EI-to-BMR ratios were 0.65 and 0.88, respectively. Among the 185 subjects with complete dietary data, 81% (n = 150) were classified as energy underreporters using the EI-to-TEE ratio cutoff; 58% (n = 107) were classified as energy underreporters using the EI-to-BMR ratio. Energy underreporters had significantly lower reported fat, higher protein, but similar carbohydrate intakes compared with non-underreporters. The EI-to-TEE ratio was not significantly associated with any demographic variables or following a diet for diabetes, but it was inversely associated with BMI (r = −0.37, P < 0.0001). In a multivariate model, demographic variables, BMI, and following a diet for diabetes explained 16% of the variance in the EI-to-TEE ratio, with the latter two variables being the only significant predictors (inversely associated). CONCLUSIONS—Widespread energy underreporting among this group of overweight African-American women with type 2 diabetes severely compromised the validity of self-reported dietary data.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available at the publisher’s Web site. Access to the full text is subject to the publisher’s access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: BMR, basal metabolic rate, DLW, doubly labeled water, EI, energy intake, IQR, interquartile range, MET, metabolic equivalent, PAL, physical activity level, RMR, resting metabolic rate, TEE, total energy expenditure
Subjects: Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases > Diabetes
Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases > Obesity
Research > studies
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Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 16 Aug 2011 11:21
Last Modified: 16 Aug 2011 11:21
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.pitt.edu/id/eprint/3064

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