Minority Health Archive

The Tuskegee Syphilis Study, 1932 to 1972: Implications for HIV Education and AIDS Risk Education Programs in the Black Community

Thomas, Stephen B and Quinn, Sandra Crouse (1991) The Tuskegee Syphilis Study, 1932 to 1972: Implications for HIV Education and AIDS Risk Education Programs in the Black Community. American Journal of Public Health, 81 (11). pp. 1498-1504. ISSN 0090-0036

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    Abstract

    The Tuskegee study of untreated syphilis in the Negro male is the longest nontherapeutic experiment on human beings in medical history. The strategies used to recruit and retain participants were quite similar to those being advocated for HIV/AIDS preention programs today. Almost 60 years after the study began, there remains a trail of distrust and suspicion that hampers HIV education efforts in Black communities. The AIDS epidemic has exposed the Tuskegee study as a histotical marker for legitimate discontent of Blacks with the public health system. The belief that AIDS is a form of genocide is rooted in a social context in which Black Americans, faced with persistent inequality, believe in conspiracy theories about Whites against Blacks. These theories range from the belief that the government promotes drug abuse in Black communities to the belief that HIV is a manmade weapon of racial warfare. An open and honest discussion of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study can facilitate the process of rebuilding trust between the Black community and public health authorities. This dialogue can contribute to the development of HIV education programs that are scientifically sound, culturally sensitive, and ethnically acceptable.


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    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Tuskegee, Tuskegee Syphilis Study, Tuskegee Study, Black, African American, AIDS, HIV, HIV education, education, programs, AIDS Risk Education Programs, Black community, African American community
    Subjects: Health > Health Equity > Bioethics
    Health > Public Health
    Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases > HIV/Aids
    Practice > outreach
    Practice > interventions
    Research > studies
    Related URLs:
    Depositing User: Timothy S. Deliyannides
    Date Deposited: 22 Feb 2006
    Last Modified: 21 Mar 2012 22:13
    Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.pitt.edu/id/eprint/393

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