Minority Health Archive

Hostility, Race, and Glucose Metabolism in Nondiabetic Individuals

Surwit, Richard S and Williams, Redford B and Siegler, Ilene C and Lane, James D and Helms, Michael and Applegate, Katherine L and Zucker, Nancy and Feinglos, Mark N and McCaskill, Cynthia M and Barefoot, John C (2002) Hostility, Race, and Glucose Metabolism in Nondiabetic Individuals. Diabetes Care, 25 (5). pp. 835-839.

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    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE— The present study was designed to determine whether hostility is differentially related to measures of glucose metabolism in African-Americans and Caucasians. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— The relationship of hostility, as measured by a subset of the Cook-Medley hostility scale (CMHOST) inventory items, to various parameters of glucose metabolism were examined in a young, healthy sample of male and female African-American and Caucasian volunteers. Fasting blood samples were collected during an inpatient admission, at which time the CMHOST was also administered. RESULTS— In the entire sample, the CMHOST was found to be significantly correlated with fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity, as measured by the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA). However, the relationship of hostility to these parameters of glucose metabolism was different in African-American and Caucasian subjects. Hostility was significantly related to fasting glucose in African-Americans and to insulin sensitivity and fasting insulin in Caucasian subjects. The relationship of hostility to insulin sensitivity and fasting insulin was partially dependent on BMI in Caucasians, but the relationship of hostility to fasting glucose was unrelated to BMI in African-Americans. CONCLUSIONS— Our data suggest that the relationship of hostility to measures of glucose metabolism is mediated differently in these two ethnic groups. Therefore, hostility seems to be part of a constellation of risk-related behaviors related to BMI in Caucasians but independently related to fasting glucose in African-Americans.


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    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: hostility, discrimination, race, glucose metabolism, diabetes
    Subjects: Research
    Practice
    Health
    Related URLs:
      Depositing User: Kismet Loftin-Bell
      Date Deposited: 10 Jul 2006
      Last Modified: 12 Apr 2011 10:48
      Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.pitt.edu/id/eprint/506

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